Guy De Maupassant

Guy De Maupassant

סופר


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
In addition to the title story, this selection of twenty-seven stories includes one of Maupassant's most famous tales, "The Necklace," and "Le Horla," a tale with strange parallels to the author's own descent into madness, as well as many other provocative and often chilling works--spanning the whole range of human experiences--from low farce, to high tragedy....

10.
A necklace of pearls and a necklace of diamonds are at the center of these two contrasting stories. The Necklace is a story of vanity, of two lives blighted by the loss of a diamond necklace, celebrated for its twist ending. From the fairytale-like collection Winter's TalesThe Pearls is a story of love and fear.
...

11.
12.
13.
Una prostituta despreciada reparte su comida con los burgueses que la acompañan asqueados en un viaje. Tambien da a aquellos conciliadores burgueses una clase de patriotismo, cuando un oficial invasor detiene el coche y demanda los favores de la prostituta como condicion para permitirles continuar el viaje. Viendo que sus vidas dependen de Bola de Sebo, los burgueses recurren a todo tipo de halagos. La prostituta finalmente se entrega al enemigo y este permite que el carruaje siga su marcha. Como si nada hubiera sucedido, las señoras y señores burgueses recobran sus posturas distantes y llenan de reproches a la mujer vulgar y ""pecadora"". Renacido el desprecio, la pobre muchacha no tiene otro consuelo que sus propias lagrimas. / A prostitute scorned shared her food with the bourgeoisie that accompany her in a trip, disgusted. She also gives those bourgeois conciliators a class of patriotism, when an enemy officer stopped the car and demands the favors of the prostitute as a condition to enable them to continue the journey. Seeing that their lives depend on Bola de Sebo, the bourgeoisie resorted to all sorts of flatteries....

14.
15.
16.
17.
Includes The Necklace, Butterball, The Tellier House, On the Water, Mademoiselle Fifi, The Mask, The Inn, A Day in the Country, The Hand, The Jewels, The Model, The Entity (The Horla)

These stories—poignant scrutinies of social pretension, wicked tales of lust and love, and harrowing examinations of terror and madness—display the full genius of Guy de Maupassant in an enthralling new translation by Joachim Neugroschel. They reveal Maupassant’s remarkable range, his technical perfection, his sexual realism, and his ability to create whole worlds and sum up intricate universes of feeling in a few pages...

18.
At once uplifting and depressing, cynical and idealistic, humorous and thought-provoking, the one thing these stories have in common is that they each leave the reader with a new insight into the human condition. The title story examines contemporary Paris and Parisian society. In "That Pig of a Morin" the author renders beautifully the interaction between the sexes, in relation to courtship as governed by the customs of the time. Female characters feature in every shape and size throughout his work and in this volume we encounter many examples, from the unfortunate Madame Loisel in "The Necklace" to the plucky Rachel in "Mademoiselle Fifi." In his stories de Maupassant found the perfect vehicle for his startling range of subjects; sharpness of observation coupled with wit and objectivity paint a vivid picture of his time. Above all, however, he is a supreme storyteller who values the telling of stories above all else—those collected here are among his very best, proving again that his quality as a writer of short stories is beyond question.
...

19.
Considered one of the world's best short story writers, de Maupassant crafted flawless tales, often known for their surprise endings, that have influenced generations of American and European writers. This unique collection contains 19 of his most famous stories and his brilliant novel Pierre and Jean....

20.
21.
Alien Hearts was the last book that Guy de Maupassant finished before his death at the early age of forty-three. It is the most original and psychologically penetrating of his several novels, and the one in which he attains a truly tragic perception of the wounded human heart. André Mariolle is a rich, handsome, gifted young man who cannot settle on what to do with himself. Madame de Burne, a glacially dazzling beauty, wants Mariolle to attend her exclusive salon for artists, composers, writers, and other intellectuals. At first Mariolle keeps his distance, but then he hits on the solution to all his problems: caring for nothing in particular, he will devote himself to being in love; Madame de Burne will be his everything. Soon lover and beloved are equally lost within a hall of mirrors of their common devising.

Richard Howard’s new English translation of this complex and brooding novel—the first in more than a hundred years—reveals the final, unexpected flowering of a great French realist’s art....

22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.





©2006-2019 לה"ו בחזקת חברת סימניה - המלצות ספרים אישיות בע"מ