Mark Twain

Mark Twain

סופר


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Set in sixteenth-century England, Mark Twain’s classic “tale for young people of all ages” features two identical-looking boys—a prince and a pauper—who trade clothes and step into each other’s lives. While the urchin, Tom Canty, discovers luxury and power, Prince Edward, dressed in rags, roams his kingdom and experiences the cruelties inflicted on the poor by the Tudor monarchy. As Christopher Paul Curtis observes in his Introduction, The Prince and the Pauper is “funny, adventurous, and exciting, yet also chock-full of . . . exquisitely reasoned harangues against society’s ills.”

This Modern Library Paperback Classic is set from the Mark Twain Project edition, which is the approved text of the Center for Scholarly Editions of the Modern Language Association....

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From the famous episodes of the whitewashed fence and the ordeal in the cave to the trial of Injun Joe, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is redolent of life in the Mississippi River towns in which Twain spent his own youth. A somber undercurrent flows through the high humor and unabashed nostalgia of the novel, however, for beneath the innocence of childhood lie the inequities of adult reality—base emotions and superstitions, murder and revenge, starvation and slavery. In his introduction, noted Twain scholar John Seelye considers Twain’s impact on American letters and discusses the balance between humorous escapades and serious concern that is found in much of Twain’s writing....

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When A Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court was published in 1889, Mark Twain was undergoing a series of personal and professional crises. In his Introduction, M. Thomas Inge shows how what began as a literary burlesque of British chivalry and culture developed to tragedy and into a novel that remains a major literary and cultural text for generations of new readers. This edition reproduces a number of the original drawings by Dan Beard, of whom Twain said "He not only illustrates the text but he illustrates my thoughts."...

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This unique '10 books in 1' edition of Mark Twain's original works contains the following complete books: 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer', 'Huckleberry Finn', 'Tom Sawyer Abroad', 'Tom Sawyer, Detective', 'Life On The Mississippi', 'The Prince and The Pauper', 'The Tradegy Of Pudd'nhead Wilson', 'A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court', 'Roughing It' and 'Following The Equator'. These are classic works which have delighted generations of American children and adults alike. An ideal gift for any fan of the wit and wisdom of Mark Twain. The entire set is available in this single, great value, edition!...

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: A Kaplan Vocabulary Building Classic for Young Readers features:

*400 vocabulary words to help students aged 9-12 improve their vocabulary while reading classic literature

*Glossary of important vocabulary words on the pages facing the text of the story

*1 page of discussion questions

*1 page of strategies for students to use to learn the meanings of difficult vocabulary words

*1 page of tips for writing a book report...


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Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title--offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords.

This edition of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn includes a Preface, Biographical Note, and Afterword by Keith Neilson.

Breezy, outrageous, thrilling from first page to last, Huckleberry Finn is the most widely read and universally loved work in American fiction. It is also the most imitated. "All modern American literature," according to Ernest Hemingway, "comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn."
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Hear It Read It With Audio CD

Tom Sawyer would rather not go to school. Instead, he spends his time playing pirates and searching for buried treasure. When Tom and his friend Huck witness a murder, only they can save their friends and the treasure from the evil Injun Joe. But are they brave enough to catch him?

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is read by Garrick Hagon, who also appeared in Star Wars and Tim Burton's Batman.

With the included CD you can HEAR the entire book, word for word, READ ALONG with the CD, or READ the story on your own.

Each HEAR IT READ IT classic presents the world's greatest classic presents the world's greatest stories in an easy-to-read abridged format. The included CD contains a dramatic reading—with music and sound effects—that match the text, word for word, so children of all ages and reading levels can read along.

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If you love a good story, then look no further. Oxford Children's Classics bring together the most unforgettable stories ever told. They're books to treasure and return to again and again.

Meet the boy who can find trouble without even looking. At school, at home, in church and outdoors, if there's mischief afoot, Tom Sawyer will be in the thick of it!...

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A collection of Twain's writings from his later years includes first-rate pieces that should be better known, as well as previously uncollected works that reflect the inner workings of one of the keenest minds in American history....

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Two young men -- one a child of the London slums, the other an heir to the throne -- switch identities in this timeless novel about class and culture in sixteenth-century England....

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Join Huckleberry Finn and runaway slave, Jim, as they escape from their tormentors and head down the Mississippi River. They have many adventures on the voyage and trouble is always close at hand. Throughout everything their friendship remains strong but will this be enough to give Jim his freedom once and for all?...

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The adventures of a mischievous young boy and his friends growing up in a Mississippi River town in the nineteenth century....

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ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP

Mark Twain's classic adventure story of life on the Mississippi.

EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:

• A concise introduction that gives readers important background information

• A chronology of the author's life and work

• A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context

• An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations

• Detailed explanatory notes

• Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work

• Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction

• A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential.

SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON...


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Tom Canty and Edward Tudor could have been identical twins. Their birthdays and their faces match, but there the likeness stops. For Edward is prince, heir to King Henry VIII of England, whilst Tom is a miserable pauper. But fate intervenes, and their identities become confused. Soon the prince is thrown out of the palace in rags, leaving ignorant Tom to play the part of a royal prince....

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These novels played a unique and lasting role in the development of American literature, and each one remains a beloved and widely read work of fiction. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn-arguably the great American novel. Ethan Frome-an enduring rural tragedy. And Moby-Dick or, The Whale-a profound inquiry into character, faith, and the nature of perception. Now, Penguin Classics is proud to present these three novels in gorgeous graphic packages featuring cover art by some of the most talented illustrators working today....

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This perennially popular Norton Critical Edition reprints for the first time the definitive Iowa-California text of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, complete with all original illustrations by Edward Windsor Kemble and John Harley. The text is accompanied by explanatory annotations. "Contexts and Sources" provides readers with a rich selection of documents related to the historical background, language, composition, sale, reception, and newly discovered first half of the manuscript of Mark Twain's greatest work. Included are letters on the writing of the novel, excerpts from the author's autobiography, samples of bad poetry that inspired his satire (including an effort by young Sam Clemens himself), a section on the censorship of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by schools and libraries over a hundred-year period, and commentary by David Carkeet on dialects of the book and by Earl F. Briden on its "racist" illustrations. In addition, this section reprints the full texts of both "Sociable Jimmy," upon which is based the controversial theory that Huck speaks in a "black voice," and "A True Story, Repeated Word for Word As I Heard It," the first significant attempt by Mark Twain to capture the speech of an African American in print.

"Criticism" of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is divided into "Early Responses" (including the first negative review) and "Modern Views" by Victor A. Doyno, T. S. Eliot, Jane Smiley, David L. Smith, Shelley Fisher Fishkin (the "black voice" thesis), James R. Kincaid (a rebuttal of Fishkin), and David R. Sewell. Also included is Toni Morrison's moving personal "Introduction" to the troubling experience of reading and re-reading Mark Twain's masterpiece.

“A Chronology and Selected Bibliography” are also included. ....

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Like its popular predecessor, this critical edition is designed for "teaching the conflicts" surrounding Mark Twain’s classic novel. It reprints the 1885 text of the first American edition (with a portfolio of illustrations) along with critical essays representing major critical and cultural controversies surrounding the work. The novel and essays are supported by distinctive editorial material — including introductions to critical conflict in literary studies, to Twain’s life and work, and to each critical controversy highlighted in this edition — that helps students grapple not only with the novel’s critical issues but also with cultural debates about literature itself. In addition to several new critical essays, the second edition includes an appendix on how to argue about the novel so that students may more effectively enter the critical conversation about its issues.
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One of the most famous travel books ever written by an American, here is an irreverent and incisive commentary on the "New Barbarians'" encounter with the Old World. Twain's hilarious satire impales with sharp wit both the chauvinist and the cosmopolitan....

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In this enduring and internationally popular novel, Mark Twain combines social satire and dime-novel sensation with a rhapsody on boyhood and on America's pre-industrial past. Tom Sawyer is resilient, enterprising, and vainglorious, and in a series of adventures along the banks of the Mississippi he usually manages to come out on top. From petty triumphs over his friends and over his long-suffering Aunt Polly, to his intervention in a murder trial, Tom engages readers of all ages. He has long been a defining figure in the American cultural imagination.

Alongside the charm and the excitement, the novel also raises questions about identity, and about attitudes to class and race. Above all, Twain's study of childhood brings into focus emergent notions of individual and literary maturity....

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Fashioned from the same experiences that would inspire the masterpiece Huckleberry Finn, Life on the Mississippi is Mark Twain’s most brilliant and most personal nonfiction work. It is at once an affectionate evocation of the vital river life in the steamboat era and a melancholy reminiscence of its passing after the Civil War, a priceless collection of humorous anecdotes and folktales, and a unique glimpse into Twain’s life before he began to write.

Written in a prose style that has been hailed as among the greatest in English literature, Life on the Mississippi established Twain as not only the most popular humorist of his time but also America’s most profound chronicler of the human comedy....

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Huck is a young, naive white boy fleeing from his drunken, dangerous Pa; and Jim is a runaway slave longing to be reunited with his family. Flung together by circumstance, they journey down the Mississippi together on a log raft, each in search of his own definition of freedom. Their daring adventures along the way provide both entertainment and a satirical look at the moral values of the Deep South of the 1800s.
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Huck Finn: The Manga Edition will be a hit with both manga readers and in the classroom. A four-page essay at the beginning ties the novel and manga together; the rest of the book is taken up with the manga novel itself. So, there should be strong carryover between those people who are manga readers and those teachers/students who want a new and unique way to read the plays.

Our Huck Finn manga is true to the original context of the play--we don't take Huck, Jim, and the rest of the characters and set them in a setting/time that's not relevant to Twain's original and intended time/setting. Also, we don't shy away frm the controversial language that you find in Twain's original work. You could say that ours is "true" to the novel....

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
With an introduction by Robert Maniquis

Mark Twain's novel is one of the first American literary masterpieces, embracing local vernacular to personify the unique small-town culture of this fledgling nation. Twain drew the adventures of the mischievous yet heroic Tom Sawyer from his own youth in a riverside Missouri town in the 1840s, and created perhaps the finest book about boyhood ever writtten. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is at once a comic and poignant story about the fears and fantasies of a boy's world, and a brilliant satire of the culture and institutions of the times. One of this beloved author's most widely read works, it is hailed as an American classic....


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The text of this Norton Critical Edition is based, with typesetting errors corrected, on the first U.S. edition (1876), the most authoritative of the editions published in Twain’s lifetime. “Backgrounds and Contexts” provides students with the standard source materials often cited by critics—Twain’s stories of Good and Bad Boys, his Boy’s Manuscript, his correspondence with William Dean Howells, and his 1870 letter to Will Bowen. This section also includes lesser-known but valuable contextual materials, among them Twain’s journalistic description of school exercise and the discussion of Perry Davis’ Pain Killer and other nineteenth-century nostrums.

“Criticism” includes interpretations by William Dean Howells, Hamlin L. Hill, Judith Fetterley, Alan Gribben, Glenn Hendler, Carter Revard, and Susan R. Gannon.

A Chronology and Selected Bibliography are also included. ....

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Tom Sawyer has an eye for adventure and is always getting into scrapes with his friends and partners in crime, Huck Finn and Joe Harper. His escapades often lead him into dangerous and desperate situations, but he always turns these to his advantage....

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It's justly the most celebrated and amusing episode from Tom Sawyer: the unforgettable chapter when Aunt Polly orders Tom to whitewash her huge fence before he can go fishing. Lucky children will have the joy of experiencing it all for the first time--Tom's wily idea, his friends' gullibility, and a job well done with no effort on the hero's part--thanks to this delightful, simplified version.

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Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894), written in a more sombre vein than his other Mississippi writings, was Mark Twain's last serious work of fiction. It reveals the sinister forces that, towards the end of his life, Twain thought to be threatening the American dream. The central plot revolves around the tragedy of "Roxy," a mulatto slave whose attempt to save her son from his fate succeeds only in destroying him. An astringent work which raises the serious issue of racial difference, Pudd'nhead Wilson is considered by the critic F.R. Leavis to be "a classic of the use of popular modes--the sensational and the melodramatic." The volume also includes two other late works by Twain, Those Extraordinary Twins and The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg....

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Great writer’s 1897 account of circumnavigating the globe by steamship. Brimming with ironic, tongue-in-cheek humor, the book describes shark fishing in Australia, riding the rails in India, tiger hunting, diamond mining in South Africa, much more; also peoples, climate, flora and fauna, customs, religion, politics, food, etc. Travel classic. 197 illustrations.
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"I have told you nothing about man that is not true." You must pardon me if I repeat that remark now and then in these letters; I want you to take seriously the things I am telling you, and I feel that if I were in your place and you in mine, I should need that reminder from time to time, to keep my credulity from flagging.

In Letters from the Earth, Twain presents himself as the Father of History -- reviewing and interpreting events from the Garden of Eden through the Fall and the Flood, translating the papers of Adam and his descendants through the generations. First published fifty years after his death, this eclectic collection is vintage Twain: sharp, witty, imaginative, complex, and wildly funny.

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Mark Twain is best known as one of this country's finest humorists and novelists. As this collection confirms, he was one of our finest essayists as well. Gathered here in a single volume, these pieces reveal the complete range of this esteemed American writer and contain some of his best, funniest, and most caustic work. "English as She Is Taught," "What Is Man?," and "Letters to Satan" are among the seventy-seven essays, each featuring Twain's witty, vital, colorful style--and reminding us why, nearly 100 years after his death, he continues to be one of the most widely read and beloved of all American authors....

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) is Mark Twain's most popular book, and its hero is a national icon, celebrated as a distinctively American figure both at home and abroad. Tom Sawyer's bold spirit, winsome smile, and inventive solutions to the problems of everyday life in fictional St Petersburg - whether getting his friends to whitewash a fence for him, or escaping the demands of his vigilant Aunt Polly - have won him the hearts of generations.
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On the banks of the Mississippi, Tom Sawyer and his friends seek out adventure at every turn. Then one fateful night they witness a murder. The boys swear never to reveal the secret and run away to be pirates and search for hidden treasure. But when Tom gets trapped in a cave with the murderer, can he escape unharmed? Richard Peck is an American novelist known for his young adult books. He was awarded American's highly prestigious Newbery Medal in 2001 for his novel "A Year Down Yonder"....

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Some call this the greatest American novel ever written. It’s the story of a runaway boy, Huck Finn, and his friend Jim, a runaway slave, as they ride a raft on the Mississippi River and encounter mishaps and adventure when they go ashore. Using the graphic novel format, Graphic Classics introduce children to many of the world’s greatest literary works. The high quality illustrations complement narratives that are paced to catch and hold young readers’ interest. In addition to its story, each Graphic Classic features a thumbnail biography of its author’s life, a list of his or her important works, a timeline of historic events that helped inspire the story’s conception, general notes, and an index. Both primary and secondary school teachers can use these books to introduce students to a representative selection of our culture’s great literary works. Many young readers who are hesitant to delve into the original books will find the graphic novel format an appealing first step toward developing good reading habits. Graphic Classics are available in both paperback and hardcover editions....

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) is Mark Twain's most popular book, and its hero is a national icon, celebrated as a distinctively American figure both at home and abroad. Tom Sawyer's bold spirit, winsome smile, and inventive solutions to the problems of everyday life in fictional St Petersburg - whether getting his friends to whitewash a fence for him, or escaping the demands of his vigilant Aunt Polly - have won him the hearts of generations.
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Though known throughout the world for his fictional novels The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain was also a skilled chronicler of his own life and experiences. In his youth, Twain traveled extensively throughout the untamed American West with his brother, working his way from town to town in a variety of jobs, including gold prospector, reporter, and lecturer. Roughing It is Twain's personal recollection of his wanderlust years. It is a wildly humorous adventure yarn that combines hard facts with a healthy dose of the author's unique perspective, one that helped define the course of American literature.

Pocket Books' Enriched Classics present the great works of world literature enriched for the contemporary reader. This edition of Roughing It has been prepared by Professor Henry B. Wonham of the University of Oregon. It includes his introduction, notes, selection of critical excerpts, and suggestions for further reading as well as a unique visual essay of period illustrations and photographs....


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A collection of Mark Twain's early writings begins with his first published work at age sixteen and includes a dazzlingly varied array of tall tales, short stories, essays, anecdotes, hoaxes, speeches, philosophies, fables, satires, and maxims....

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The idyllic boyhood of one of literature's most beloved characters comes alive again with fun, mischief, and adventure in an illustrated edition from the popular Illustrated Junior Library, featuring a striking new cover....

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Mark Twain explores the darker side of humanity with his typical sardonic wit in this unique collection of mysterious and supernatural tales, highlighted by the classic novelette The Mysterious Stranger.
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.
 
"Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the only one of Mark Twain's various books which can be called a masterpiece. I do not suggest that it is his only book of permanent interest; but it is the only one in which his genius is completely realized, and the only one which creates its own category." T. S. Eliot




Huckleberry Finn, rebel against school and church, casual inheritor of gold treasure, rafter of the Mississippi, and savior of Jim the runaway slave, is the archetypical American maverick.

Fleeing the respectable society that wants to "sivilize" him, Huck Finn shoves off with Jim on a rhapsodic raft journey down the Mississippi River. The two bind themselves to one another, becoming intimate friends and agreeing "there warn't no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft."

As Huck learns about love, responsibility, and morality, the trip becomes a metaphoric voyage through his own soul, culminating in the glorious moment when he decides to "go to hell" rather than return Jim to slavery.

Mark Twain defined classic as "a book which people praise and don't read"; Huckleberry Finn is a happy exception to his own rule. Twain's mastery of dialect, coupled with his famous wit, has made Adventures of Huckleberry Finn one of the most loved and distinctly American classics ever written.

 

Nominated for a Grammy for his work as co-producer of the five-CD box set The Jazz Singers (1998), Robert O'Meally is Zora Neale Hurston Professor of Literature at Columbia University and Director of Columbia University's Center for Jazz Studies. He is the principal writer of Seeing Jazz (1997), the catalogue for the Smithsonian's exhibit on jazz and literature, and the co-editor of The Norton Anthology of African American Literature (1996).

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Presenting Mark Twain’s timeless stories of Tom Sawyer and his friends Joe Harper and Huckleberry Finn, brilliantly brought to graphic novel through Frederique Voulyze’s vibrant art. Sawyer’s adventures including pirating on the Mississippi River, schoolyard fisticuffs, and his genius fence-painting scheme, haven’t lost any of their appeal over a hundred years after Twain first wrote this classic novel.  Almost every young boy or girl fantasizes of tagging along with Tom and Huck, sharing their incredible escapades.  Through Morvan’s adaptation and Voulyze’s art, the reader can live the fantasy of exploring the muddy banks of the Mississippi, tagging along with Tom and his friends through experiences that never grow old.

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Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title—offering clear, accurate, and readable text. All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords.

This edition of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer includes a Biographical Note, Preface, and Afterword by Keith Neilson.
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Switched at birth by a female slave who fears for her infant son's life, a light-skinned child changes places with the master's white son. From this simple premise, Mark Twain fashioned one of his most entertaining, funny, yet biting novels, an engrossing tale of reversed identities, an eccentric detective, a horrible crime, and a tense courtroom scene....

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Pudd'nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins contain Twain's most overt treatment of the moral and societal implications of slavery in America. This Norton Critical Edition remains the only edition available that is based on completely re-edited texts, accounting for all versions that Twain might have written or influenced. All substantive variants in the two separate "first editions," one printed in Britain and the other in the United States, have been reconciled in this collated edition, with all rejected variants tabulated. Dozens of additional illustrations accompany the text, and all textual variants, accepted or rejected, are included.

"Criticism" includes twenty-three reviews and interpretive essays, eight of them new to the Second Edition, including those by Andrew Jay Hoffman, Myra Jehlen, and John Carlos Rowe.

About the Series: No other series of classic texts equals the caliber of the Norton Critical Editions. Each volume combines the most authoritative text available with the comprehensive pedagogical apparatus necessary to appreciate the work fully. Careful editing, first-rate translation, and thorough explanatory annotations allow each text to meet the highest literary standards while remaining accessible to students. Each edition is printed on acid-free paper and every text in the series remains in print. Norton Critical Editions are the choice for excellence in scholarship for students at more than 2,000 universities worldwide....


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For deft plotting, riotous inventiveness, unforgettable characters, and language that brilliantly captures the lively rhythms of American speech, no American writer comes close to Mark Twain. This sparkling anthology covers the entire span of Twain’s inimitable yarn-spinning, from his early broad comedy to the biting satire of his later years.

Every one of his sixty stories is here: ranging from the frontier humor of “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” to the bitter vision of humankind in “The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg,” to the delightful hilarity of “Is He Living or Is He Dead?” Surging with Twain’s ebullient wit and penetrating insight into the follies of human nature, this volume is a vibrant summation of the career of–in the words of H. L. Mencken–“the father of our national literature.”...

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This series features classic tales retold with attractive color illustrations. Educators using the Dale-Chall vocabulary system adapted each title. Each 70-page, softcover book retains key phrases and quotations from the original classics....

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'All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn,' Ernest Hemingway wrote. 'It's the best book we've had.' A complex masterpiece that has spawned volumes of scholarly exegesis and interpretative theories, it is at heart a compelling adventure story. Huck, in flight from his murderous father, and Nigger Jim, in flight from slavery, pilot their raft thrillingly through treacherous waters, surviving a crash with a steamboat, betrayal by rogues, and the final threat from the bourgeoisie. Informing all this is the presence of the River, described in palpable detail by Mark Twain, the former steamboat pilot, who transforms it into a richly metaphoric entity. Twain's other great innovation was the language of the book itself, which is expressive in a completely original way. 'The invention of this language, with all its implications, gave a new dimension to our literature,' Robert Penn Warren noted. 'It is a language capable of poetry.' ...

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Treasured historical satire, played out in two very different socio-economic worlds of 16th-century England, focuses on two young look-alikes—Edward, the Prince of Wales, and Tom Canty, a street beggar. When both youngsters decide to trade clothes and roles, they find their lives drastically altered. This timeless tale of transposed identities remains one of Twain’s best-loved novels.
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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: A Kaplan Vocabulary Building Classic for Young Readers features:

*400 vocabulary words to help students aged 9-12 improve their vocabulary while reading classic literature

*Glossary of important vocabulary words on the pages facing the text of the story

*1 page of discussion questions

*1 page of strategies for students to use to learn the meanings of difficult vocabulary words

*1 page of tips for writing a book report...


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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.
 

Perhaps the best-loved nineteenth-century American novel, Mark Twain’s tale of boyhood adventure overflows with comedy, warmth, and slapstick energy. It brings to life an array of irresistible characters—the awesomely self-confident Tom, his best buddy Huck Finn, indulgent Aunt Polly, and the lovely, beguiling Becky—as well as such unforgettable incidents as whitewashing a fence, swearing an oath in blood, and getting lost in a dark and labyrinthine cave. Below Tom Sawyer’s sunny surface lurk hints of a darker reality, of youthful innocence and naïveté confronting the cruelty, hypocrisy, and foolishness of the adult world—a theme that would become more pronounced in Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Despite such suggestions, Tom Sawyer remains Twain’s joyful ode to the endless possibilities of childhood.

 

H. Daniel Peck is John Guy Vassar Professor of English at Vassar College and is the author of Thoreau’s Morning Work and A World by Itself: The Pastoral Moment in Cooper’s Fiction.
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A pauper caught up in the pomp of the royal court.

A prince wandering horror-stricken through the lower depths of English society.

Out of the theme of switched identities, Mark Twain fashioned both a scathing attack upon social hypocrisy and injustice, and an irresistible comedy imbued with the sense of high-spirited play that belongs to his happiest creative period....

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The adventure of a lifetime

Tom Sawyer’s pal Huck Finn finds himself on the run, floating down the Mississippi with Jim, a runaway slave. With rich description as well as sharp satire, Twain vividly recreates the world he knew as a child....

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'Cordially hated and dreaded by all the mothers of the town because he was idle, and lawless, vulgar, and bad - and because all their children admired him so', Huckleberry Finn, the fourteen-year-old son of the town drunkard, joins runaway slave Jim on an exciting journey down the mighty Mississippi River on a raft....

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ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP

A nineteenth-century American travels back in time to sixth-century England in this darkly comic social satire.

THIS ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:

  • A concise introduction that gives the reader important background information
  • A chronology of the author's life and work
  • A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context
  • An outline of key themes and plot points to guide the reader's own interpretations
  • Detailed explanatory notes
  • Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work
  • Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction
  • A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential.

SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON...


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Introduction by Ron Powers
Includes Newly Commissioned Endnotes

Arguably the first major American novel to satirize the political milieu of Washington, D.C. and the wild speculation schemes that exploded across the nation in the years that followed the Civil War, The Gilded Age gave this remarkable era its name. Co-written by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner, this rollicking novel is rife with unscrupulous politicians, colorful plutocrats, and blindly optimistic speculators caught up in a frenzy of romance, murder, and surefire deals gone bust. First published in 1873 and filled with unforgettable characters such as the vainglorious Colonel Sellers and the ruthless Senator Dilsworthy, The Gilded Age is a hilarious and instructive lesson in American history....

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The great American writer Ernest Hemingway, had this to say about Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn: "All modern, literature, stems from this one book." In this quintessential American novel, Tom Sawyer's best friend, Huckleberry Finn, travels down the Mississippi River on a raft with a slave named Jim, getting himself in and out of danger along the way....


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Featuring the brilliantly drawn Roxanna, a mulatto slave who suffers dire consequences after switching her infant son with her master’s baby, and the clever Pudd’nhead Wilson, an ostracized small-town lawyer, Twain’s darkly comic masterpiece is a provocative exploration of slavery and miscegenation. Leslie A. Fiedler described the novel as “half melodramatic detective story, half bleak tragedy,” noting that “morally, it is one of the most honest books in our literature.” Those Extraordinary Twins, the slapstick story that evolved into Pudd’nhead Wilson, provides a fascinating view of the author’s process.

The text for this Modern Library Paperback Classic was set from the 1894 first American edition....

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At the beginning of Pudd'nhead Wilson a young slave woman, fearing for her infant's son's life, exchanges her light-skinned child with her master's.  From this rather simple premise Mark Twain fashioned one of his most entertaining, funny, yet biting novels.  On its surface, Pudd'nhead Wilson possesses all the elements of an engrossing nineteenth-century mystery:  reversed identities, a horrible crime, an eccentric detective, a suspenseful courtroom drama, and a surprising, unusual solution.  Yet it is not a mystery novel.  Seething with the undercurrents of antebellum southern culture, the book is a savage indictment in which the real criminal is society, and racial prejudice and slavery are the crimes.  Written in 1894, Pudd'nhead Wilson glistens with characteristic Twain humor, with suspense, and with pointed irony:  a gem among the author's later works....

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Mark Twain defined classic as "a book which people praise and don't read"; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a happy exception to his own rule. Twain's mastery of dialect, coupled with his famous wit, has made Huckleberry Finn one of the most loved and distinctly American classics ever written.
...

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El gran clásico por excelencia de la literatura norteamericana.

Todo el mundo conoce a Tom Sawyer y Huck Finn, dos de los grandes personajes de ficción de todos los tiempos que ya son patrimonio de la humanidad, más allá de su creador, Mark Twain.
La crítica considera esta novela no sólo la culminación del arte narrativo de Twain sino la gran obra maestra, junto a Moby Dick, de la narrativa norteamericana. Estamos pues ante un texto fundacional, un clásico entre clásicos que constituye además una lectura deliciosa.
Mark Twain, con su sentido del humor y su pluma ágil, precisa, virtuosa y envolvente nos lleva río Mississippi abajo de la mano de Huck Finn, que va en busca de la libertad junto a Jim, un negro que busca escapar de la esclavitud.

Novela sobre la amistad, la adolescencia y la libertad, esta edición de Las aventuras de Huckleberry Finn se abre con un prólogo del gran escritor chileno Roberto Bolaño y va también acompañada de ilustraciones del dibujante norteamericano Edward Kemble....

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Fascinating humorous account of 1897 voyage to Hawaii, Australia, India, New Zealand, etc. Ironic, bemused reports on peoples, customs, climate, flora and fauna, politics, much more. 197 illustrations....

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Aimed at young readers, this adventure-themed collection of adapted classic books will entertain youngsters with characters and storylines that seek to foster their love for reading. These classics are a great way for young readers to start building their very own library.
 
Orientado al público infantil-juvenil, esta colección de obras clásicas de aventura busca entretener a lectores jóvenes con personajes e historias que fomentarán su amor por la lectura. Estos libros clásicos son la manera perfecta para que los jóvenes empiecen su propia biblioteca.
...

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This is Mark Twain's description of life on the Mississippi River, with observations and anecdotes about the culture and society along the river valley. It includes character sketches, historical facts, information and reminiscences of Twain's boyhood and experiences as a steam-boat pilot. Part travel book, part autobiography, and part social commentary, "Life on the Mississippi" is a memoir of the cub pilot's apprenticeship, a record of Twain's return to the river and to Hannibal as an adult, a meditation on the harsh vagaries of nature, and a study of the varied and sometimes violent activities engaged in by those who live on the river's shores....

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Very few people know that Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) wrote a major work on Joan of Arc. Still fewer know that he considered it not only his most important but also his best work. He spent twelve years in research and many months in France doing archival work and then made several attempts until he felt he finally had the story he wanted to tell. He reached his conclusion about Joan's unique place in history only after studying in detail accounts written by both sides, the French and the English. Because of Mark Twain's antipathy to institutional religion, one might expect an anti-Catholic bias toward Joan or at least toward the bishops and theologians who condemned her. Instead one finds a remarkably accurate biography of the life and mission of Joan of Arc told by one of this country's greatest storytellers. The very fact that Mark Twain wrote this book and wrote it the way he did is a powerful testimony to the attractive power of the Catholic Church's saints. This is a book that really will inform and inspire....

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THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. This 80-page adaptation has been painstakingly edited to retain the integrity of the original work, and to convey a sense of the author's style and the novel's theme. A low reading level assu...

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Combined in one volume, these whimsical diaries are at bottom both an argument for women's equality and an irreverent look at conventional religion....

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Considerada una de las obras cumbres del género, la novela de Twain narra las travesuras y los sueños del niño que le da título y de su compañero Huckleberry Finn, quien más adelante protagonizaría otra novela del autor. Con el inmenso río Mississippi como escenario de fondo Mark Twain traslada a las páginas algunas de sus vivencias infantiles, de hecho asegura que Huck Finn existió de verdad y que Tom Sawyer también ""aunque no se trata de un solo individuo, sino que es la combinación de la características de tres muchachos a los que conocí"" . / This is Mark Twain's first novel about Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, and it has become one of the world's best-loved books. It is a fond reminiscence of life in Hannibal, Missouri, an evocation of Mark Twain's own boyhood along the banks of the Mississippi during the 1840s. ""Most of the adventures recorded in this book really occurred,"" he tells us. T...

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A rare unabridged version of the companion work to Huckleberry Finn. This story's cheerful and adventurous hero plays truant to form a pirate band and, together with his best friend Huckleberry Finn, finds fun, excitement and buried treasure along the shores of the Mississippi river. Read with great character by Garrick Hagon....

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"I went to Maui to stay a week and remained five. I had a jolly time. I would not have fooled away any of it writing letters under any consideration whatever." --Mark Twain

So Samuel Langhorne Clemens made his excuse for late copy to the Sacramento Union, the newspaper that was underwriting his 1866 trip. If the young reporter's excuse makes perfect sense to you, join the thousands of Island lovers who have delighted in Twain's efforts when he finally did put pen to paper....


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The adventures of a boy and a runaway slave as they travel down the Mississippi River on a raft....

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AudioFile Earphones Award Winner

This humorous and nostalgic novel takes the listener back to the carefree days of boyhood in Hannibal, Missouri, where Mark Twain grew up. Just what did boys do in a small Midwestern town during the mid-1800s, a time when there were no televisions, no arcades, and no videos? They whitewashed fences, floated down rivers, traded marbles, formed secret societies, smoked pipes, and, on occasion, managed to attend their own funerals. Yes, they may have been a bit mischievous, but as Aunt Polly said of Tom when she believed him to be dead, 'He was the best-hearted boy that ever was.' Aunt Polly's sentiments reveal a cardinal tenet of Twain's philosophy: In this deceitful and infirm world, innocence can be found only in the heart of a boy....


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'Cordially hated and dreaded by all the mothers of the town because he was idle, and lawless, vulgar, and bad - and because all their children admired him so', Huckleberry Finn, the fourteen-year-old son of the town drunkard, joins runaway slave Jim on an exciting journey down the mighty Mississippi River on a raft....

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ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED

BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP

A collection of short works by one of America's most revered, iconoclastic, and enduring voices?Mark Twain.

EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:

• A concise introduction that gives readers important background information

• A chronology of the author's life and work

• A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context

• An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations

• Detailed explanatory notes

• Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work

• Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction

• A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience

Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential.

SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON

...

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"Mark Twain's autobiography is a classic of American letters, to be ranked with the autobiographies of Benjamin Franklin and Henry Adams.... It has the marks of greatness in it--style, scope, imagination, laughter, tragedy."--From the Introduction by Charles Neider

Mark Twain was a figure larger than fife: massive in talent, eruptive in temperament, unpredictable in his actions. He crafted stories of heroism, adventure, tragedy, and comedy that reflected the changing America of the time, and he tells his own story--which includes sixteen pages of photos--with the same flair he brought to his fiction. Writing this autobiography on his deathbed, Twain vowed to he "free and frank and unembarrassed" in the recounting of his life and his experiences.

Twain was more than a match for the expanding America of riverboats, gold rushes, and the vast westward movement, which provided the material for his novels and which served to inspire this beloved and uniquely American autobiography.

...

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This grand old childhood classic relates a small-town boy’s pranks and escapades with humor and wisdom that appeal to readers of every age. In addition to his everyday stunts (searching for buried treasure, trying to impress the adored Becky Thatcher), Tom experiences a dramatic turn of events when he witnesses a murder, runs away, and returns to attend his own funeral and testify in court.
...

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"All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn," Ernest Hemingway wrote, "It's the best book we've had." A complex masterpiece that has spawned volumes of scholarly exegesis and interpretative theories, it is at heart a compelling adventure story. Huck, in flight from his murderous father, and Nigger Jim, in flight from slavery, pilot their raft thrillingly through treacherous waters, surviving a crash with a steamboat, betrayal by rogues, and the final threat from the bourgeoisie. Informing all this is the presence of the River, described in palpable detail by Mark Twain, the former steamboat pilot, who transforms it into a richly metaphoric entity. Twain's other great innovation was the language of the book itself, which is expressive in a completely original way. "The invention of this language, with all its implications, gave a new dimension to our literature," Robert Penn Warren noted. "It is a language capable of poetry." ...

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THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY. The adventures of a young boy traveling down the Mississippi River with an escaped slave....

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Mark Twain explores the darker side of humanity with his typical sardonic wit in this unique collection of mysterious and supernatural tales, highlighted by the classic novelette The Mysterious Stranger.
...

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Publisher: Toronto Musson Book Co Publication date: 0 Notes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes. When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. You can also preview the book there....

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Some call this the greatest American novel ever written. It’s the story of a runaway boy, Huck Finn, and his friend Jim, a runaway slave, as they ride a raft on the Mississippi River and encounter mishaps and adventure when they go ashore. Using the graphic novel format, Graphic Classics introduce children to many of the world’s greatest literary works. The high quality illustrations complement narratives that are paced to catch and hold young readers’ interest. In addition to its story, each Graphic Classic features a thumbnail biography of its author’s life, a list of his or her important works, a timeline of historic events that helped inspire the story’s conception, general notes, and an index. Both primary and secondary school teachers can use these books to introduce students to a representative selection of our culture’s great literary works. Many young readers who are hesitant to delve into the original books will find the graphic novel format an appealing first step toward developing good reading habits. Graphic Classics are available in both paperback and hardcover editions....

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Switched at birth by a female slave who fears for her infant son's life, a light-skinned child changes places with the master's white son. From this simple premise, Mark Twain fashioned one of his most entertaining, funny, yet biting novels, an engrossing tale of reversed identities, an eccentric detective, a horrible crime, and a tense courtroom scene.
...

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You had better shove this in the stove," Mark Twain said at the top of an 1865 letter to his brother, "for I don't want any absurd 'literary remains' and 'unpublished letters of Mark Twain' published after I am planted." He was joking, of course. But when Mark Twain died in 1910, he left behind the largest collection of personal papers created by any nineteenth-century American author.

Here, for the first time in book form, are twenty-four remarkable pieces by the American master—pieces that have been handpicked by Robert Hirst, general editor of the Mark Twain Project at the University of California, Berkeley. In "Jane Austen," Twain wonders if Austen's goal is to "make the reader detest her people up to the middle of the book and like them in the rest of the chapters." "The Privilege of the Grave" offers a powerful statement about the freedom of speech while "Happy Memories of the Dental Chair" will make you appreciate modern dentistry. In "Frank Fuller and My First New York Lecture" Twain plasters the city with ads to promote his talk at the Cooper Union (he is terrified no one will attend). Later that day, Twain encounters two men gazing at one of his ads. One man says to the other: "Who is Mark Twain?" The other responds: "God knows—I don't."

Wickedly funny and disarmingly relevant, Who Is Mark Twain? shines a new light on one of America's most beloved literary icons—a man who was well ahead of his time.

...

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Presenting Mark Twain’s timeless stories of Tom Sawyer and his friends Joe Harper and Huckleberry Finn, brilliantly brought to graphic novel through Frederique Voulyze’s vibrant art. Sawyer’s adventures including pirating on the Mississippi River, schoolyard fisticuffs, and his genius fence-painting scheme, haven’t lost any of their appeal over a hundred years after Twain first wrote this classic novel.  Almost every young boy or girl fantasizes of tagging along with Tom and Huck, sharing their incredible escapades.  Through Morvan’s adaptation and Voulyze’s art, the reader can live the fantasy of exploring the muddy banks of the Mississippi, tagging along with Tom and his friends through experiences that never grow old.

...

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A classic tour of the wild west

In 1861, young Mark Twain found himself adrift as a tenderfoot in the Wild West—and Roughing It is his hilarious record of his travels come to life with his inimitable mixture of reporting, social satire, and rollicking tall tales....

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This irresistible tale of the adventures of two friends growing up in frontier America is one of Mark Twain's most popular novels. The farcical, colorful, and poignant escapades of Tom and his friend Huckleberry Finn brilliantly depict the humor and pathos of growing up on the geographic and cultural rim of nineteenth-century America. Originally intended for children, the book transcends genre in its magical depiction of innocence and possibility, and is now regarded as one of Twain's masterpieces. As Frank Conroy observes in his Introduction, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer has become a sacred text within the body of American literature.

This version, which reproduces the Mark Twain Project edition, is the approved text of the Center for Scholarly Editions of the Modern Language Association....

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Other volumes in this set include ISBN number(s): 0766161374. Volume 1 of 2. In this autobiography, Mark Twain is speaking from the grave, literally. He would not allow the book to be published until after his death, so that he could speak freely, as in a love letter. In the manner in which Twain is so well-known, his autobiography is really not an autobiography at all, but a series of entertaining stories and opinions, dinner table talks, such as he had always delivered in his own home and elsewhere, and with about the same latitude and elaboration. Twain's narrative is not in any sense a mere fairy tale, many of the chapters, especially the earlier ones, are vividly true in their presentation. The things he told of Mrs. Clemens and Susy are marvelously and beautifully true in spirit and aspect, and the story as a whole is amazingly faithful in the character picture it presents of the man himself....

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Great writer’s 1897 account of circumnavigating the globe by steamship. Brimming with ironic, tongue-in-cheek humor, the book describes shark fishing in Australia, riding the rails in India, tiger hunting, diamond mining in South Africa, much more; also peoples, climate, flora and fauna, customs, religion, politics, food, etc. Travel classic. 197 illustrations.
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Switched at birth by a female slave who fears for her infant son’s life, a light-skinned child changes places with the master’s white son. This simple premise underlies Twain’s engrossing 19th-century tale of reversed identities, an eccentric detective, a horrible crime, and a tense courtroom scene. Infused with characteristic Twain humor, the novel also fiercely condemns a racially prejudiced society that condoned the institution of slavery.
...

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One of America's greatest storytellers, Samuel Clemens had something witty and wise to say on just about any topic. Gathered from his classic novels, diary entries, newspaper articles, and correspondence, this collection of wry quips and quotes reflects his keen observations on animals, critics, doctors, laughter, politics, youth, and more.
...

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Here is the story of Tom, Huck, Becky, and Aunt Polly; a tale of adventures, pranks, playing hookey, and summertime fun. Written by the author sometimes called "the Lincoln of literature," The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was surprisingly neither a critical nor a financial success when it was first published in 1876. It was Mark Twain's first novel. However, since then Tom Sawyer has become his most popular work, enjoying dramatic, film, and even Broadway musical interpretations....


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In which America's greatest writer accompanies a boatload of often ridiculous, provincial pilgrims on The Tour of Europe and the Holy Land, as pretensions are punctured, much supposedly taken for granted is viewed with a jaundiced eye, and what could be a mere travel book rises to the level of great literature: a microcosm of the entire human comedy....

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