Beverly Cleary

Beverly Cleary

סופר


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Beezus and Ramona
Beezus Quimby tries very hard to be patient with her littler sister, but four-year-old Ramona has the habit of doing the most unpredictable, annoying, embarrassing things in the world. Sometimes Beezus doesn’t like Ramona very much, and that makes her feel very guilty. Sisters are supposed to love each other but pesky little Ramona just doesn’t seem very lovable to Beezus.

Ramona and Her Father
Ramona just wants everyone to be happy. But Ramona’s father has lost his job and nobody in the Quimby household is in a very good mood. Ramona tries to cheer up the family but her best efforts only make things worse. But when her father admits he wouldn’t trade her for a million dollars, Ramona knows everything is going to work out fine in the end....

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Ramona Quimby is sure fourth grade will be "the best year of her life, so far." She can show off her calluses from swinging on the rings in the park, sit across the aisle from the boy she calls Yard Ape, and enjoy her cheerful new teacher, Mrs. Meacham. Most exciting of all, Ramona has a new best friend, Daisy.

Fourth grade doesn't turn out quite the way Ramona has hoped. Mrs. Meacham wants her to improve her spelling. Ramona also must be a good role model for her baby sister, Roberta. And Mrs. Quimby wants her to spend more time with, the super-perfect Susan. Fourth-grade life isn't always easy, but it's full of adventure, and at the end of it all- a "zeroteenth" birthday to celebrate!

01 AZ Young Reader Award Masterlist (Intermed. cat.), 01 Colorado Children's Book Award (Jr. Novel Cat.), 00-01 Young Reader's Choice Award Program Masterlist, and 00-01 Keystone to Reading Book Award Masterlist

00 Children's Choices (IRA/CBC)

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Dear Mr. Henshaw,

I wish somebody would stop stealing the good stuff out of my lunchbag. I guess I wish a lot of other things, too. I wish someday Dad and Bandit would pull up in front in the rig ... Dad would yell out of the cab, "Come on, Leigh. Hop in and I'll give you a lift to school."

Leigh Botts has been author Boyd Henshaw's number one fan ever since he was in second grade. Now in sixth grade, Leigh lives with his mother and is the new kid at school. He's lonely, troubled by the absence of his father, a cross-country trucker, and angry because a mysterious thief steals from his lunchbag. Then Leigh's teacher assigns a letter-writing project. Naturally Leigh chooses to write to Mr. Henshaw, whose surprising answer changes Leigh's life.

Winner of the Newbery Medal
An ALA Notable Book 

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Jane Purdy tells herself this as she begins an afternoon of babysitting. Luck is on her side, too -- for whom should she meet but Stan Crandall: good-looking, friendly, and brand-new in town. And he wants to take Jane out! But Jane, just an ordinary girl, is filled with doubts. Suppose her parents won't let her go? What if she makes a fool of herself? Or worse -- what if her father embarrasses her in front of Stan? Jane has finally met the boy of her dreams. Is she ready for him?

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At last Beverly Cleary has given Ramona Quimby a book of her own. No longer is she the shy nemesis of Henry Huggins or the exasperating responsibility of Beezus. Instead she is a five-year-old with spirit'and a rare opportunity to explain her side of things.

The story deals with Ramona's entrance into kindergarten, a memorable event for all concerned. Whether Ramona is proving what a good rester she is by snoring delicately during quiet time or whether she is pulling Susan's tempting curls, she makes her presence known. Most of the time Ramona loves her teacher, Miss Binney, wholeheartedly. How Miss Binney feels is anyone's guess. Mrs. Quimby tells her daughter, "She will never forget you as long as she lives."

Nothing seems quite so funny to children as the tales of what they did when they were little. Here then is an account of kindergarten days for readers who have passed that awkward stage. Many will find that Ramona's escapades hilarious; others will be moved by her struggles to make a place for herself in an uncomprehending world.

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Beverly Cleary has given books to each member of the Quimby household except Mrs. Quimby. Now she gets her turn at last in a story that hits the high and low points of a working mother's life as seen from Ramona's seven-and-a-half-year-old viewpoint.

Inevitably domestic tensions, not without their amusing side, occasionally arise. Mr. and Mrs. Quimby sometimes forget who is to do what, as when the Crock-Pot is not plugged in and dinner remains uncooked. Beezus acquires a ludicrous teased hairdo at the student body shop while Ramona gets a becoming pixie haircut. Ramona, who feels unloved, takes to twitching her nose like a rabbit in a cozy picture book until her teacher becomes concerned that something is making her nervous.

Yet Ramona is wrong. She is loved, and readers will rejoice with her when she discovers the wonderful truth. Few writers today are as skilled as Mrs. Cleary at showing families in the round, and here she is at the peak of her powers.

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Beverly Cleary has given books to each member of the Quimby household except Mrs. Quimby. Now she gets her turn at last in a story that hits the high and low points of a working mother's life as seen from Ramona's seven-and-a-half-year-old viewpoint.

Inevitably domestic tensions, not without their amusing side, occasionally arise. Mr. and Mrs. Quimby sometimes forget who is to do what, as when the Crock-Pot is not plugged in and dinner remains uncooked. Beezus acquires a ludicrous teased hairdo at the student body shop while Ramona gets a becoming pixie haircut. Ramona, who feels unloved, takes to twitching her nose like a rabbit in a cozy picture book until her teacher becomes concerned that something is making her nervous.

Yet Ramona is wrong. She is loved, and readers will rejoice with her when she discovers the wonderful truth. Few writers today are as skilled as Mrs. Cleary at showing families in the round, and here she is at the peak of her powers.

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When Ralph and his pesky cousins accidentally make a mess at the Mountain View Inn, Ralph decides that he'd better take his motorcycle and leave. He persuades his young pal Ryan to take him to school, where Ralph is an instant hit with Ryan's classmates. But Ralph doesn't like being told what to do. Worse than that, his precious motorcycle gets broken. Is Ralph stuck at school forever?

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All Henry Huggins wants is his very own bicycle, a shiny red one to ride up and down Klickitat Street. But no matter how Henry tries to raise money for the bike of his dreams -- from selling bubble gum to delivering newspapers -- he always ends up with too much trouble and not enough money. But Henry's old friend Beezus has an idea that may turn Henry's worst trouble yet into a real business success!

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For Henry Huggins and his friends Robert and Murph, a clubhouse is a place where they can do as they please, without being bothered by girls. The sign that says NO GIRLS ALLOWED -- THIS MEANS YOU especially means Ramona Quimby. Lately Ramona has been following Henry on his newspaper route, embarrassing him in front of Henry's customers. The day Ramona follows Henry to the clubhouse, she wants to teach him girls aren't so bad, but she almost puts an end to his newspaper career forever.

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When twins Jimmy and Janet squabble over Janet's collection of "thingamajigs" their mom presents them with a "grown-up" surprise and Janet's collection becomes a thingamajig of the past. "The softly colored illustrations neatly catch the spirit of this slice of real life."--Kirkus Reviews....

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La vida cambia para Henry Huggins con la aparición de Ribsy, un perro flaco y desgarbado que encuentra un día a la salida de la Y.M.C.A. Juntos corren toda clase de aventuras, desde perder un hermoso balón de fútbol, hastacelebrar una Navidad "verde". Con Ribsy aprende el valor del trabajo, el respeto a la propiedad ajena y también que todos merecemos ganar un premio, incluso un perro feúcho y de raza desconocida. Pero lo más importante para Henry será averiguar con quién decidirá quedarse Ribsy.

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Henry Huggins can't wait until he turns eleven years old, so he can have a paper route like his friend Scooter McCarthy. Henry wants to prove to the route manager that he is responsible enough to handle the job right now. First he thinks of giving away free kittens with newspaper subscriptions, and then his advertising scheme helps his class win the newspaper drive. But he still doesn't have a paper route. Will Ramona Quimby, making a real pest of herself, help Henry get the job he wants so much?

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Jimmy and Janet are twins, but that doesn't mean they are just alike.

When we first meet Jimmy, he wants to dig a real hole. He likes to use a real, grown-up shovel. While he's working, his sister, Janet, pretends to be a bird! She likes to use her imagination. But the twins both like silly jokes, brand- new boots, and talking to Mr. Lemon, the mailman.

As Beverly Cleary writes about Jimmy and Janet's doings, the unique understanding of children that she brings to all of her beloved books is coupled with a keen awareness of duo dynamics that comes from raising twins herself.

Originally published as four separate picture books (The Real Hole, Two Dog Biscuits, The Growing-Up Feet, and Janet's Thingamajigs), these are stories that a Jimmy would like because they are so true-to-life, and that a Janet would love because they are so believable.

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Genuinely funny books for children are few and far between. So when a story like Henry Huggins comes along, it comes to stay. In this irresistible boy's adventures, children everywhere see themselves.

During one unforgettable year that begins when Henry discovers a lost, hungry dog he calls Ribsy, readers will have a grand time. Before the suspenseful conclusion, they'll meet Henry's friends on Klickitat Street--including Beezus and her little sister, Ramona--and enjoy lots of funny happenings. No wonder this continuously engaging and heartwarming book is a classic!

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Ramona Quimby is a character intimately known by Beverly Cleary readers. In this story of Ramona's year in second grade they will come to know Mr. Quimby equally well. As it opens he loses his job without warning, and Ramona's seven-year-old view of this all-too-frequently family crisis rings every change of mood from tears to laughter.

Not surprisingly, Ramona takes an active hand in the problems that develop. She practices television commercials in order to earn a million dollars, but only succeeds in insulting her teacher when she delivers a disparaging line about wrinkles in pantyhose. She grows concerned that Mr. Quimby's smoking will turn his lungs black launches an energetic No Smoking campaign. Sometimes Mr. Quimby's temper frays under the strain of his uncertain future and Ramona's attentions, but he proves as resilient as his daughter and the Quimbys cope better than they realize.

Once again children will be both entertained and comforted by the understanding of their triumphs and tribulations that they find in this wise, funny book.

"Another warm, funny, pithy story about Ramona, now in second grade. Daddy loses his job and there are resultant strains on family finances and relationships, but life goes on. In any household containing Ramona it could hardly do otherwise."--Booklist...

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It seems too good to be true. The most popular boy in school has asked Jane out -- and she's never even dated before. Stan is tall and good-looking, friendly and hard-working -- everything Jane ever dreamed of. But is she ready for this?

Suppose her parents won't let her go? What if she's nervous and makes a fool of herself? Maybe he'll think she's too young. If only she knew all the clever things to say. If only she were prettier. If only she were ready for this...

With her usual warmth, perceptiveness, and humor, Beverly Cleary creates the joys and worries of a young girl's first crush....

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Jimmy and Janet are twins, but that doesn't mean they are just alike.

When we first meet Jimmy, he wants to dig a real hole. He likes to use a real, grown-up shovel. While he's working, his sister, Janet, pretends to be a bird! She likes to use her imagination. But the twins both like silly jokes, brand- new boots, and talking to Mr. Lemon, the mailman.

As Beverly Cleary writes about Jimmy and Janet's doings, the unique understanding of children that she brings to all of her beloved books is coupled with a keen awareness of duo dynamics that comes from raising twins herself.

Originally published as four separate picture books (The Real Hole, Two Dog Biscuits, The Growing-Up Feet, and Janet's Thingamajigs), these are stories that a Jimmy would like because they are so true-to-life, and that a Janet would love because they are so believable.

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Ramona is off to kindergarten, and it's the greatest day of her life. So why is she sitting on the bench while the rest of the students play the game gray duck? Laughs and minor upsets abound in an enormously popular story starring the one and only Ramona Quimby!...

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Newbery Medalist Beverly Cleary has penned a wise and funny book, filled with the perceptive humor that has earned her generations of fans, about a little girl who rebels against learning to write in cursive. Black-and-white illustrations....

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Ramona feels quite grown-up taking the bus by herself, helping big sister Beezus make dinner, and trying hard to be nice to pesky Willa Jean after school. Turning eight years old and entering the first grade can do that to a girl. So how can her teacher call her a nuisance?...

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Ralph is not like the other mice at the Mountain View Inn. He is always looking for adventure. It is Ralph's lucky day when a young guest named Keith arrives with a shiny miniature motorcycle. Right away, Ralph knows that the motorcycle is special—made to be ridden by an adventurous mouse. And once a mouse can ride a motorcycle . . . almost anything can happen!

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Ramona Quimby, uno de los personajes más queridos de la literatura infantil, empieza el tercer grado con una maestra nueva que los llama "chices". Nuestra incontrolable heroína se enfrenta a un reto tras otro, desde lavarse la cabeza con huevos, hasta vomitar delante de toda la clase, cuando trata de demostrarle a la señora Ballenay que ella no es una "superfastidiosa".

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Socks is the name of the newest character to be created by Beverly Cleary. He is a young tabby cat with four white paws, and he lives happily with a young married couple, Marilyn and Bill Bricker. The center of the Bricker household, Socks rules it affectionately but firmly.

Into this loving home, however, comes another pet. This creature has a small, wrinkled, furless face, and Mr. and Mrs. Bricker spend an inordinate amount of time trying to burp it. Its arrival fills Socks with jealousy and a terrible anxiety. How the rivalry between Socks and Charles William, the Bricker baby, turns into an alliance makes a domestic drama both touching and funny.

Although her story is about a cat and faithful to his point of view in every detail, Mrs. Cleary demonstrates with it the emotional upheaval experienced by a child who must learn to share his parents. As young readers come to understand Socks and his problems, they will gain a new understanding of themselves. But, most of all, they will laugh.

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Kids everywhere feel connected to Ramona's unique way of looking at the world as she tries to adjust to new teachers, feels jealous about Susan's curls, and is secretly pleased by Yard Ape's teasing. The scrapes she gets herself into—like wearing pajamas to school or accidentally making egg yolk shampoo—are funny and heartwarming, and sometimes embarrassing. No matter what—Ramona's lively, curious spirit shines through.

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All your favorite Ralph Mouse tales in one boxed set -- just in time for the holiday season! ...

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For Henry Huggins and his friends Robert and Murph, a clubhouse is a place where they can do as they please, without being bothered by girls. The sign that says NO GIRLS ALLOWED -- THIS MEANS YOU especially means Ramona Quimby. Lately Ramona has been following Henry on his newspaper route, embarrassing him in front of Henry's customers. The day Ramona follows Henry to the clubhouse, she wants to teach him girls aren't so bad, but she almost puts an end to his newspaper career forever.

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Socks is one happy cat....

He lives with a nice young couple called Brickers who play with him, pet him, feed him treats, and always have a warm lap for him to sit in. Then a new baby joins the family Suddenly, the Brickers are sharing their laps and love with Charles William, and Socks is getting into trouble. He runs from a phantom dog, wrestles with Nana's best wig, and fights Old Taylor the tomcat for his territory. But as Charles William grows, Socks discovers that he has a new friend and a new way to be a part of the family.

A purr-fectly hilarious portrait of life with a baby from a cat's point of view.

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Determined to be brave, six-year-old Ramona Quimby has to deal with starting first grade, her mother's new job, and a teacher who does not understand how hard it is for Ramona to grow up. Reprint. SLJ. AB. PW. ...

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Henry Huggins's dog, Ribsy, is hopelessly lost in a huge shopping mall parking lot. It's raining hard, the pavement is slick, horns are honking, and drivers are shouting. When Ribsy thinks he has found the Hugginses' new station wagon at last, he jumps in the open tailgate window and falls asleep, exhausted. When he wakes up find himself in the wrong car, lots of little girls pet him and make plans to give him a bath. All Ribsy wants to do is go home to Henry. Instead, he's about to begin the liveliest adventure of his life.

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Ramona the Brave
The summer before first grade sure isn't an easy one for Ramona. She’s worried about starting school and it doesn’t help that so many other changes are going on in the Quimby house. And when Ramona finally takes her place in her new classroom, she realizes that first grade is not for cowards.

Ramona Quimby, Age 8
Now that Ramona is eight, she can go to a new school with a new teacher and ride the bus all by herself. But after school, Ramona has to stay with Mrs. Kemp and be nice to bratty Willa Jean. Back at home, Mr. Quimby’s going to college and Mrs. Quimby’s going to work. All the Quimbys have to adjust, and Ramona gets her chance to prove that she's "big enough for her family to depend on."...

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Fed up with his family, Ralph decides to hop on his motorcycle and head down the road to Happy Acres Camp. Unfortunately, life at camp is not all peanut butter and jelly sandwiches! A strict watchdog, a mouse-hungry cat, and a troubled boy named Garf keep Ralph on his toes and away from his precious motorcycle. Perhaps home is not such a bad place to be, if only Ralph can find a way to get there again!

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Ramona is back! New and old friends alike will rejoice in Beverly Cleary's latest book about spunky Ramona and the whole Quimby family.

From the minute that Howie Kemp's "rich" Uncle Hobart arrives from Saudi Arabia, things are off to a rousing start. There are new beginnings and discoveries and two very special surprises - one surprise is big and one is very little.

It's a time of change for all the Quimbys; a time of new joys and little sadnesses, too. There are new worries - Mr Quimby is worried about finding a teaching job, Ramona is worried they may have to move if he does, and Beezus is worried about her teenage complexion.

And through it all Ramona, a grown up third-grader, remains a sometimes pesty, sometimes brave, sometimes blunderful, but always wonderful Ramona - forever!

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Genuinely funny books for children are few and far between. So, when a story like Henry Huggins comes along, it comes to stay. Children everywhere see themselves in this irresistible boy's adventures.

During an unforgettable year that begins when Henry discovers a lost, hungry dog he calls Ribsy, listeners will have a grand time. Before the suspenseful conclusion, they'll meet Henry's friends on Klickitat Street, including Beezus and her little sister, Ramona, and enjoy lots of hilarious happenings. No wonder this continuously engaging and heartwarming story is a classic!

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Vroom-vroom! Ratta-tatta,
ratta-tatta. Cha-kung!
Nobody can catch LUCKY CHUCK!

Speed along with Chuck in this reissue of a funny, fast-paced tale by one of America's most beloved authors, Beverly Cleary. You'll quickly learn what happens when safety rules are ignored and be fascinated by the detailed motorcycle drawings. J. Winslow Higginbottom's original pencil illustrations have been brightened with color to give Chuck's bike a clean red shine for this new edition.

Happy reading and riding!

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Newbery Medalist Beverly Cleary has penned a wise and funny book, filled with the perceptive humor that has earned her generations of fans, about a little girl who rebels against learning to write in cursive. Black-and-white illustrations....

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Everyone needs thingamajigs, and four-year-old Janet means to keep, her thingamajigs to herself.

Each day Janet carefully chooses three little thingamajigs. And each day she neatly wraps them in a paper bag and puts them in her crib -- safe from her brother Jimmy's meddling hands. But when the bags fill Janet's crib, Mother is at her wit's end until she saves the day by giving the twins a big surprise that makes Janet's paper-bag collection a thingamajig of the past.

In this delightful new Jimmy and Janet story, Newbery medalist Beverly Cleary vividly recreates the pride a child takes in growing up. DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan's appealing, softly colored illustrations make this a true-to-life classic that is sure to find a place in every child's heart.

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