John Updike

John Updike

סופר


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After traveling the world to exotic lands, Alexandra, Jane, and Sukie–now widowed but still witches–return to the Rhode Island seaside town of Eastwick, “the scene of their primes,” site of their enchanted mischief more than three decades ago. Diabolical Darryl Van Horne is gone, and what was once a center of license and liberation is now a “haven of wholesomeness” populated by hockey moms and househusbands acting out against the old ways of their own absent, experimenting parents. With spirits still willing but flesh weaker, the three women must confront a powerful new counterspell of conformity. In this wicked and wonderful novel, John Updike is at his very best–a legendary master of literary magic up to his old delightful tricks....

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More than three decades have passed since the events described in John Updike’s The Witches of Eastwick. The three divorcées–Alexandra, Jane, and Sukie–have left town, remarried, and become widows. They cope with their grief and solitude as widows do: they travel the world, to such foreign lands as Canada, Egypt, and China, and renew old acquaintance. Why not, Sukie and Jane ask Alexandra, go back to Eastwick for the summer? The old Rhode Island seaside town, where they indulged in wicked mischief under the influence of the diabolical Darryl Van Horne, is still magical for them. Now Darryl is gone, and their lovers of the time have aged or died, but enchantment remains in the familiar streets and scenery of the village, where they enjoyed their lusty primes as free and empowered women. And, among the local citizenry, there are still those who remember them, and wish them ill. How they cope with the lingering traces of their evil deeds, the shocks of a mysterious counterspell, and the advancing inroads of old age, form the burden of Updike’s delightful, ominous sequel....

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"Some of the most beautiful writing in contemporary American literature is between the covers of this book . . ." BOSTON HERALD

The triumphant collection of short stories by America's most acclaimed novelist.


From the Paperback edition....

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The third and fourth novel in John Updike’s acclaimed quartet of Rabbit books–now in one marvelous volume.

RABBIT IS RICH
Winner of the American Book Award and
the National Book Critics Circle Award


“Dazzlingly reaffirms Updike’s place as master chronicler of the spiritual maladies and very earthly pleasure of the Middle-American male.”
Vogue

“A splendid achievement!”
The New York Times


RABBIT AT REST
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and
the National Book Critics Circle Award

“Brilliant . . . It must be read. It is the best novel about America to come out of America for a very, very long time.”
The Washington Post Book World

“Powerful . . . John Updike with his precision’s prose and his intimately attentive yet cold eye is a master.”
The New York Times Book Review...

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John Updike has written a brilliant novel that ranks among the most provocative of his distinguished career. Terrorist is the story of Ahmad Ashmawy Mulloy, an alienated American-born teenager who spurns the materialistic, hedonistic life he witnesses in the slumping New Jersey factory town he calls home. Turning to the words of the Holy Qur’an as expounded to him by the pedantic imam of a local mosque, Ahmad devotes himself fervently to God. Neither the world-weary guidance counselor at his high school nor Ahmad’s mischievously seductive classmate Joryleen succeeds in deflecting him from his course, as the threads of an insidious plot gather around him.

“One compelling and surprising ride.”–USA Today
“The startlingly contemporary story of a high school student . . . whose zealous Islamic faith and disaffection with modern life make him a pawn in the larger conflict between Muslim and Christian, East and West. They also make him a powerful voice for Updike’s ongoing critique of American civilization.”
–Time

“A chilling tale that is perhaps the most essential novel to emerge from Sept. 11.”
People (Critic’s Choice)...

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“A drop of truth, of lived experience, glistens in each.” This is how John Updike, one of the world’s most acclaimed novelists, modestly describes his nonfiction work, the brilliant and graceful essays and criticism he has written for more than five decades. Due Considerations is his sixth collection, and perhaps the most moving, stylish, and personal volume yet. Here he reflects on such writers and works as Emerson, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Colson Whitehead, The Wizard of Oz, Don DeLillo, The Portrait of a Lady, Margaret Atwood, The Mabinogion, and Proust. Updike also provides a whimsical and insightful list of “Ten Epochal Moments in the American Libido,” from Pocahontas and John Smith to Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky; muses on how the practice of faith changes but doesn’t disappear; and shares his reaction to the attacks on 9/11 (in Brooklyn that day, “Freedom, reflected in the street’s diversity and quotidian ease, felt palpable”). Due Considerations proves that John Updike is, as noted in The Boston Globe, “our greatest critic of literature.”


Praise for Due Considerations
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A New York Times Notable Book

“The prose is clean, elegant, exquisitely calibrated. . . . [Updike is] one of the best essayists and critics this country has produced in the last century.”
–Los Angeles Times Book Review

“Updike’s scope is rather breathtaking. . . . When I do not know the subject well–as in his finely illustrated art reviews of Bruegel, Dürer and Goya–I learn much from what Updike has to impart. When he considers an author I love, like Proust or Czeslaw Milosz, I often find myself appreciating familiar things in a new way.”
–Christopher Hitchens, The New York Times Book Review

“With his pack-rat curiosity . . . his prodigious memory and attendant knack for choosing the ‘just-right’ fact or quote, and his ever-present astonishment at both the stupidity and genius on display wherever he looks, Updike is in many ways an ideal critic. . . . It is a privilege to be in the company of this wonderfully American voice.”
–Rocky Mountain News

“Updike knows more about literature than almost anyone breathing today. . . . He's beyond knowledgeable–he makes Google look wanting.”
Baltimore Sun

“Provocative and incisive . . . This volume reminds us that [Updike’s] prose sets our literary bar very high indeed.”
–The Charlotte Observer

“Updike offers an effortless mastery of form and content.”
–The Boston Globe...

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"It is, quite simply, Updike's best novel yet." NEWSWEEK

A deftly satirical portrait of life and love in a suburban town as only Updike can paint it.


From the Paperback edition....

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A stunning collection of poems that John Updike wrote during the last seven years of his life and put together only weeks before he died for this, his final book.

The opening sequence, “Endpoint,” is made up of a series of connected poems written on the occasions of his recent birthdays and culminates in his confrontation with his final illness. He looks back on the boy that he was, on the family, the small town, the people, and the circumstances that fed his love of writing, and he finds endless delight and solace in “turning the oddities of life into words.”

“Other Poems” range from the fanciful (what would it be like to be a stolen Rembrandt painting? he muses) to the celebratory, capturing the flux of life. A section of sonnets follows, some inspired by travels to distant lands, others celebrating the idiosyncrasies of nature in his own backyard.

For John Updike, the writing of poetry was always a special joy, and this final collection is an eloquent and moving testament to the life of this extraordinary writer....

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“He is a religious writer; he is a comic realist; he knows what everything feels like, how everything works. He is putting together a body of work which in substantial intelligent creation will eventually be seen as second to none in our time.”
—William H. Pritchard, The Hudson Review, reviewing Museums and Women (1972)


A harvest and not a winnowing, The Early Stories preserves almost all of the short fiction John Updike published between 1954 and 1975.

The stories are arranged in eight sections, of which the first, “Olinger Stories,” already appeared as a paperback in 1964; in its introduction, Updike described Olinger, Pennsylvania, as “a square mile of middle-class homes physically distinguished by a bend in the central avenue that compels some side streets to deviate from the grid pattern.” These eleven tales, whose heroes age from ten to over thirty but remain at heart Olinger boys, are followed by groupings titled “Out in the World,” “Married Life,” and “Family Life,” tracing a common American trajectory. Family life is disrupted by the advent of “The Two Iseults,” a bifurcation originating in another small town, Tarbox, Massachusetts, where the Puritan heritage co-exists with post-Christian morals. “Tarbox Tales” are followed by “Far Out,” a group of more or less experimental fictions on the edge of domestic space, and “The Single Life,” whose protagonists are unmarried and unmoored.

Of these one hundred three stories, eighty first appeared in The New Yorker, and the other twenty-three in journals from the enduring Atlantic Monthly and Harper’s to the defunct Big Table and Transatlantic Review. All show Mr. Updike’s wit and verbal felicity, his reverence for ordinary life, and his love of the transient world.


From the Hardcover edition....

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John Updike's first collection of new short fiction since the year 2000, My Father's Tears finds the author in a valedictory mood as he mingles narratives of his native Pennsylvania with stories of New England suburbia and of foreign travel.

Morocco (Disc 1, Track 1)
Personal Archaeology (Disc 1, Track 31)
Free (Disc 1, Track 55)
The Walk with Elizanne (Disc 1, Track 80)
The Guardians (Disc 2, Track 28)
The Laughter of the Gods (Disc 2, Track 52)
Varieties of Religious Experience (Disc 2, Track 90
Spanish Prelude to a Second Marriage (Disc 3, Track 72)
Delicate Wives (Disc 4, Track 9)
The Accelerating Expansion of the Universe (Disc 4, Track 32)
German Lessons (Disc 4, Track 72)
The Road Home (Disc 5, Track 15)
My Father's Tears (Disc 5, Track 67)
Kinderszenen (Disc 6, Track 19)
The Apparition (Disc 6, Track 62)
Blue Light (Disc 6, Track 96)
Outage (Disc 7, Track 48)
The Full Glass (Disc 8, Track 19)

In sum, American experience from the Depression to the aftermath of 9/11 finds reflection in these glittering pieces of observation, remembrance, and imagination....

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John Updike's first collection of new short fiction since the year 2000, My Father's Tears finds the author in a valedictory mood as he mingles narratives of his native Pennsylvania with stories of New England suburbia and of foreign travel.

Morocco (Disc 1, Track 1)
Personal Archaeology (Disc 1, Track 31)
Free (Disc 1, Track 55)
The Walk with Elizanne (Disc 1, Track 80)
The Guardians (Disc 2, Track 28)
The Laughter of the Gods (Disc 2, Track 52)
Varieties of Religious Experience (Disc 2, Track 90
Spanish Prelude to a Second Marriage (Disc 3, Track 72)
Delicate Wives (Disc 4, Track 9)
The Accelerating Expansion of the Universe (Disc 4, Track 32)
German Lessons (Disc 4, Track 72)
The Road Home (Disc 5, Track 15)
My Father's Tears (Disc 5, Track 67)
Kinderszenen (Disc 6, Track 19)
The Apparition (Disc 6, Track 62)
Blue Light (Disc 6, Track 96)
Outage (Disc 7, Track 48)
The Full Glass (Disc 8, Track 19)

In sum, American experience from the Depression to the aftermath of 9/11 finds reflection in these glittering pieces of observation, remembrance, and imagination....

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John Updike's first collection of new short fiction since the year 2000, My Father's Tears finds the author in a valedictory mood as he mingles narratives of his native Pennsylvania with stories of New England suburbia and of foreign travel.

Morocco (Disc 1, Track 1)
Personal Archaeology (Disc 1, Track 31)
Free (Disc 1, Track 55)
The Walk with Elizanne (Disc 1, Track 80)
The Guardians (Disc 2, Track 28)
The Laughter of the Gods (Disc 2, Track 52)
Varieties of Religious Experience (Disc 2, Track 90
Spanish Prelude to a Second Marriage (Disc 3, Track 72)
Delicate Wives (Disc 4, Track 9)
The Accelerating Expansion of the Universe (Disc 4, Track 32)
German Lessons (Disc 4, Track 72)
The Road Home (Disc 5, Track 15)
My Father's Tears (Disc 5, Track 67)
Kinderszenen (Disc 6, Track 19)
The Apparition (Disc 6, Track 62)
Blue Light (Disc 6, Track 96)
Outage (Disc 7, Track 48)
The Full Glass (Disc 8, Track 19)

In sum, American experience from the Depression to the aftermath of 9/11 finds reflection in these glittering pieces of observation, remembrance, and imagination....

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Twelve poems follow a family and their friends through the seasons. A Caldecott Honor Book....

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(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

Collected together for the first time in hardcover, these eighteen classic stories from across John Updike’s career form a luminous chronicle of the life and times of one marriage in all its rich emotional complexity.

In 1956, Updike published a story, “Snowing in Greenwich Village,” about a young couple, Joan and Richard Maple, at the beginning of their marriage. Over the next two decades, he returned to these characters again and again, tracing their years together raising children, finding moments of intermittent happiness, and facing the heartbreak of infidelity and estrangement. Seventeen Maples stories were collected in 1979 in a paperback edition titled Too Far to Go, prompted by a television adaptation. Now those stories appear in hardcover for the first time, with the addition of a later story, “Grandparenting,” which returns us to the Maples’s lives long after their wrenching divorce....

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John Updike’s first collection of new short fiction since the year 2000, My Father’s Tears finds the author in a valedictory mood as he mingles narratives of his native Pennsylvania with stories of New England suburbia and of foreign travel.

“Personal Archaeology” considers life as a sequence of half-buried layers, and “The Full Glass” distills a lifetime’s happiness into one brimming moment of an old man’s bedtime routine. High-school class reunions, in “The Walk with Elizanne” and “The Road Home,” restore their hero to youth’s commonwealth where, as the narrator of the title story confides, “the self I value is stored, however infrequently I check on its condition.” Exotic locales encountered in the journeys of adulthood include Morocco, Florida, Spain, Italy, and India. The territory of childhood, with its fundamental, formative mysteries, is explored in “The Guardians,” “The Laughter of the Gods,” and “Kinderszenen.” Love’s fumblings among the bourgeoisie yield the tart comedy of “Free,” “Delicate Wives,” “The Apparition,” and “Outage.”

In sum, American experience from the Depression to the aftermath of 9/11 finds reflection in these glittering pieces of observation, remembrance, and imagination....

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John Updike’s first collection of new short fiction since the year 2000, My Father’s Tears finds the author in a valedictory mood as he mingles narratives of his native Pennsylvania with stories of New England suburbia and of foreign travel.

“Personal Archaeology” considers life as a sequence of half-buried layers, and “The Full Glass” distills a lifetime’s happiness into one brimming moment of an old man’s bedtime routine. High-school class reunions, in “The Walk with Elizanne” and “The Road Home,” restore their hero to youth’s commonwealth where, as the narrator of the title story confides, “the self I value is stored, however infrequently I check on its condition.” Exotic locales encountered in the journeys of adulthood include Morocco, Florida, Spain, Italy, and India. The territory of childhood, with its fundamental, formative mysteries, is explored in “The Guardians,” “The Laughter of the Gods,” and “Kinderszenen.” Love’s fumblings among the bourgeoisie yield the tart comedy of “Free,” “Delicate Wives,” “The Apparition,” and “Outage.”

In sum, American experience from the Depression to the aftermath of 9/11 finds reflection in these glittering pieces of observation, remembrance, and imagination....

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John Updike's first collection of new short fiction since the year 2000, My Father's Tears finds the author in a valedictory mood as he mingles narratives of his native Pennsylvania with stories of New England suburbia and of foreign travel.

Morocco (Disc 1, Track 1)
Personal Archaeology (Disc 1, Track 31)
Free (Disc 1, Track 55)
The Walk with Elizanne (Disc 1, Track 80)
The Guardians (Disc 2, Track 28)
The Laughter of the Gods (Disc 2, Track 52)
Varieties of Religious Experience (Disc 2, Track 90
Spanish Prelude to a Second Marriage (Disc 3, Track 72)
Delicate Wives (Disc 4, Track 9)
The Accelerating Expansion of the Universe (Disc 4, Track 32)
German Lessons (Disc 4, Track 72)
The Road Home (Disc 5, Track 15)
My Father's Tears (Disc 5, Track 67)
Kinderszenen (Disc 6, Track 19)
The Apparition (Disc 6, Track 62)
Blue Light (Disc 6, Track 96)
Outage (Disc 7, Track 48)
The Full Glass (Disc 8, Track 19)

In sum, American experience from the Depression to the aftermath of 9/11 finds reflection in these glittering pieces of observation, remembrance, and imagination....

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טוב, מי שמכיר את ג'והן אפדייק כבר יודע למה לצפות אבל בכל זאת הסיפור הז... המשך לקרוא
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